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Tourist Information -

Locals know their area best! Local and regional Tourist Associations and municipal services for Towns give visitors up to date information on attractions. Check out their “must see” listings:

 

 


Tourism Sarnia-Lambton
Your time is precious so visit Discoveries That Matter in Sarnia & Lambton County. With “Blue Flag” rated beaches and million dollar gallery and museum exhibits, our blue water vacation playground offers attractions for all ages in all seasons. Be sure to stop by and take your picture with our giant Canada geese! Visit us online: www.tourismsarnialambton.com/bwvg
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Saugeen Shores Chamber of Commerce, Port Elgin Tourist Information & Southampton Visitors' Centre
The Saugeen Shores Chamber of Commerce operates the Port Elgin Tourist Information Office at 559 Goderich Street and the Southampton Visitors’ Centre at 201 High Street.  Our helpful experts can provide you with maps, brochures, restaurant, accommodation and attraction information.  Get directions, referrals to local businesses and weekly event listings.  Pick up our Experience Guide, ideas for day tripping, theatre playbills, provincial tourist information and more.  It’s all here and we can’t wait to see you! Our Chamber also offers accommodation
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Grey Roots Museum & Archives
Grey Roots Museum & Archives is located on Grey Road 18, the city bypass west of Rockford. The impressive complex hosts exhibits, a theatre, café, museum store, archives and educational programs. Moreston Village is open daily during summer. See costumed interpreters perform pioneering life skills that would daunt the most accomplished multi-tasker! Buildings include 1800s log homes, a blacksmith shop, schoolhouse, 1900s automotive garage and bandstand. Special traveling exhibits change each season and children's programs augment the interest for young people. This summer's special
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French River Resorts Association
Where friends and family meet...memories are made. French River Resorts Association members offer accommodations in resorts, wilderness lodges, housekeeping cottages, cabins, trailer parks, and campgrounds. Enjoy the French River Provincial Park, outdoor and Eco-tourism, fishing, boating, canoeing, kayaking, hiking, camping, bird watching, star gazing, outdoor photography, biking, ATV motor sports, and golfing nearby. Experience fine dining with American Plan Lodges or prepare your own meals at cottage resorts. French River area is a paradise for outdoor adventures year
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Collingwood Museum & Station Welcome Centre
The Collingwood Museum and tourist information are housed in the Station Welcome Centre at St. Paul & Huron Streets. The building is an impressive reincarnation of the original 1873 railway terminal. The museum displays genuine aboriginal artifacts and exhibits of Collingwood's shipbuilding days, including a video of the port's last side launch.
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Municipality of Central Manitoulin - Mindemoya
“With deep roots, the sky is our only limit” Explore the villages of Providence Bay, Mindemoya, Spring Bay, Sandfield and Big Lake, home to beautiful beaches and lakes. Tourist services include accommodations, restaurants, LCBO, pharmacy and grocery store. High speed internet and cellular service is available in most areas. Boat launches are located at: 570 Dial Road at Windfall Lake, 25 Hutchinson Road at Manitou Lake, northwest end of Big Lake, Perivale Road West at Kagawong Lake, and Ketchankookum Trail at Mindemoya Lake. A marina is located at Providence Bay. In the village
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Midland Tourism
The Town of Midland is situated at the gateway to Georgian Bay's picturesque 30,000 Islands. Our culturally rich town has become the economic hub of North Simcoe for economic prosperity, envious lifestyle in idyllic surroundings and an abundance of recreational pursuits.
 Midland flourishes with:    •    A vibrant and bustling downtown core consisting of unique stores and professional business offices promoted by a Business Improvement Area.    •    Recent commercial growth includes Wal-Mart, Real Canadian
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Oakview Woods Bike, Skate & Bark Parks
Wasaga Beach Area 6 has an information centre, band gazebo, soccer pitch and tennis courts at the Oakview Woods recreation complex on Mosley Street at 42nd Street. Skateboard and bike parks with ramps, rails and dirt jumps, and a “Bark Park” for exercising dogs, are located beside the information centre. All beach areas have washrooms, picnic areas and bike paths.
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Manitoulin Tourism Association
Manitoulin Island is unique in many ways – it is the world’s largest sweet water or fresh-water Island. It has more than a hundred inland lakes between its shores, and many of those lakes have islands in them! There are more than two dozen small settlements, First Nations and towns spread out across more than 160 kilometers of boreal forest, lakes, rivers, shorelines, escarpments, meadows and alvars.Follow us on Facebook Visit www.manitoulintourism.com for information on Accommodations, Dining, Eateries, Activities and the Latest Current/Upcoming Events on the Largest
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Municipality of Killarney
The Municipality of Killarney stretches from Baie Fine and Frazer Bay in the west to the French, Pickerel and Key Rivers in the east. Its boundaries are included within the districts of Manitoulin, Sudbury and Parry Sound and its 1,578 square kilometres encompass a large area of natural forests, wetlands, mountains, lakes, bays and rivers. For those who love the rugged wilderness, sport fishing, camping, kayaking and other outdoor activities, the place to be is anywhere in the Municipality of Killarney.    The Township of Rutherford and George Island was incorporated in 1929.
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Bruce Power Visitors' Centre
Every year thousands of visitors arrive at the Bruce Power Visitors’ Centre to learn more about nuclear energy and electricity generation. Looking out over the world’s largest nuclear power facility, the Visitors’ Centre is located north of Tiverton, adjacent to Ontario’s first commercial wind farm, Huron Wind. It is open year-round Monday to Friday as well as weekends in July and August; closed statutory and year-end holidays. Admission is free with complimentary Wi Fi and electric car charging stations. A picnic area with tables is available during the warmer months
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Kincardine Tourism
Ceud Mile Failte – A hundred thousand welcomes from the Municipality of Kincardine! In this community deeply rooted to Scottish Heritage and Culture, you’ll delight to the sights and sounds of Scotland…in Ontario! March with the Kincardine Scottish Pipe Band, as they parade Queen Street EVERY Saturday evening throughout the summer, a ‘must-do’ while visiting! Not visiting on a weekend? Be sure to take in one of our breathtaking Lake Huron sunsets, and listen to the tranquil sounds of the Phantom Piper who lulls the sun to sleep from atop the Kincardine
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Tourism Goderich
  The Port of Goderich, known since Victorian times as the “Prettiest Town in Canada”, is a complete community that offers something for everyone. Goderich’s downtown core, known universally as “The Square” is home to over 140 shops, restaurants, and other businesses that cater to every taste imaginable. In summer months, the downtown is home to Goderich’s well-known Farmer’s and Flea Markets, selling Ontario grown fruits and vegetables, honey, maple syrup, plants and flowers, some pork products and fish, homemade baked goods, homemade preserves
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Wiarton & District Chamber of Commerce
Nestled against the towering bluffs of the Niagara Escarpment, Wiarton is a thriving four seasons community. Founded in 1894, Wiarton is the largest community within the amalgamated municipality of The Town of South Bruce Peninsula. Its most famous resident, Wiarton Willie, fuels Wiarton’s international recognition, as part of the Wiarton Willie Festival, which can run as long as 5 days. Wiarton Willie hosts national and often international media for his Groundhog Day prediction.While a primary destination for visitors and tourists in the summer months, there is always something to see
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Leamington District Chamber of Commerce
The Leamington & District Chamber of Commerce is a community organization dedicated to being a visible and pro-active voice for business, tourism and promotion of the district. This is achieved through strong partnerships, active members, and involvement of volunteers, dynamic leadership and implementation of innovative programs.
 We are keeping busy at the Leamington District Chamber of Commerce and if there is something you would like to see, please drop us a line, call or even stop into our office at 318 Erie Street South - we would love to hear from you!  Keep posted on
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Port of Little Current
The beautiful clear waters of the North Channel await your arrival into the Port of Little Current. Enjoy some of the best boating in Lake Huron on your trip through the North Channel, staying a while in the quaint town of Little Current. Little Current is a picturesque small town, its downtown bustling in the summer months with boats, and travelers strolling the newly renovated docks. From the Downtown Docks you are at a prime location for just about everything you need, and from Spider Bay Marina just a short, scenic walk to downtown Little Current. Browse the shops on Water Street, grab
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Dinosaur Valley Mini Golf & Josephine's Vegetables
An Inaugural Tourism Federation of Ontario's Innovation Award Winner, nominated by Attractions Ontario in 2003. This mini-golf is said to be best in the world, featuring seven unique courses, a total of 63 holes with dinosaur and dragon exhibits, both realistic and fantastic. Visitors walk through a 22 by 18-foot steel dragon skull to enter the park. Exquisite metal sculptures of dinosaurs and dragons preside over holes fashioned from angular and curved steel rails, ensuring unpredictable surprises that will make you laugh and have lots of fun. Play any combination you like to ensure a unique
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Historic Downtown Chatham
Visitors to Downtown Chatham can sample an eclectic mix of food, fashion and fun while browsing through stylishly restored heritage buildings that lend the downtown its old fashioned charm. The riverside walkway is a lovely promenade that parallels downtown King Street and Tecumseh Park makes a great place to have a picnic. Perry Molema Garden is a nice spot to relax beside the fountain at the corner of William & King Streets.The first big event for downtown Chatham is RetroFest™, the 17th annual festival of classic cars with two full days of nostalgic fun on May 26th and 27th, 2017
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Tobermory Chamber of Commerce
The Tobermory Chamber of Commerce provides detailed information about local businesses and activities in the Tobermory area. Visitors may consult our web site or visit the Information Office located in the Community Centre at 7420 Highway 6 in Tobermory. Hours: Winter: Saturdays 10 am - 4 pm Spring & Fall: Daily from 9 am - 5 pm Summer: Daily from 8 am - 8 pm
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Amherstburg
Discover Amherstburg, a town firmly rooted in the War of 1812 era when the British established Fort Malden as a defense against American invasion. Today Amherstburg is famous for its historic buildings, charming downtown shops, gourmet restaurants, scenic harbour, International Peace Sculpture and Provincial Marine Monument. Glorious rhododendrons and a Hosta Garden grace the elegant King's Navy Yard Park with their colourful blooms. The Farmers’ Market and Amherstburg Costumes & Doll Museum open Saturday mornings (May–Sep) at Malden Community Centre by Road Jct. 9 & 20.
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Arkona
When it comes to bountiful fresh fruit and beautiful scenery, Arkona has more than its share. Its orchards contain thousands of fruit trees that include apples, pears, plums, peaches and cherries. Blossom time in May is gorgeous and July is even better when fruit ripens at U-pick farms. The Ausable Gorge is a 1700-hectare valley designated as an Area of National & Scientific Interest by Carolinian Canada. The gorge was carved out thousands of years ago by the river, exposing the underlying fossilized bedrock, making the gorge a world-renowned treasure for fossil enthusiasts. Collecting
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Bala
Bala is a charming village in the heart of Muskoka Lakes’ “cottage country”. It features notable art galleries and studios, shops, restaurants and entertainment adjacent to beautiful water cascades and picnic areas that overlook the Moon River at the outlet of Lake Muskoka. Jaspen Park, on Rd. 38, has a beach and playground. Windsor Park has a dock and picnic area where Tuesday night Water Ski Shows are held during summer. A Farmers’ Market opens on Mondays during summer. The area is known for its cranberry bogs where berries are harvested each fall by flooding the
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Balm Beach
Balm Beach, west of Midland, is an oasis made for recreation. A break-wall of colourful boulders and shade trees shelters a crescent of soft sand where watercraft, sailboard and kayak rentals offer cool fun. Restaurants and cottage resorts provide water-front escapes to leisurely enjoyment. Off road trails provide invigorating walking, cycling or skiing through naturalized corridors free of traffic, such as the Tiny Trail that parallels County Rd 6 from Penetanguishene to Elmvale. The trail follows a former railway over scenic trestles and through forested landscape. Local farm market stands
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Bayfield
Bayfield is well known for its delightful boutiques, many of which are housed in restored buildings of 19th century architecture. Visitors may browse through stores to find home accessories, jewellery, gifts, stylish clothing, antiques, art and crafts, or indulge in such tempting delights as gourmet chocolates or fresh pastry in the shade of enormous trees that line Main Street. Quaint restaurants provide fine dining or pub fare. Clan Gregor Square has a lovely playground. Bayfield is made for biking with quiet streets and trails to explore, and bike rentals are available on Main Street.
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Belle River/Lakeshore
The Town of Lakeshore encompasses a number of small communities along the south shore of Lake St. Clair. The centre of the municipality is located at Belle River, which is situated on County Rd. 22 east of Windsor. The downtown core along Notre Dame St. is attractively landscaped with flowerbeds that enhance the tidy and colourful appearance of the community. A beach, playground, children’s splash pad, picnic shelters and washrooms are located at Lakeview Park off First St. at the Belle River waterfront for everyone to enjoy. New developments include a naturalization area for fish
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Birch Island/McGregor Bay
Scattered across Great La Cloche Island are huge boulders. Natives once struck these rocks to send signals. Hence, voyageurs named the islands La Cloche, meaning "the bell" in French. The legendary Dreamer's Rock, located at Sunshine Alley Rd, is an aboriginal sacred site where people go on spiritual vision quests. Permission to visit the site must first be obtained from Whitefish River First Nation office at Birch Island. Killarney Provincial Park, the jewel of Ontario's wilderness parks, is accessible via Hwy 637, Hwy 6 near Willisville or Lake Panache via Road 10. The stunning La Cloche
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Blenheim/Erieau
Blenheim is in the heart of the Carolinian zone where tender fruits such as cherries, plums, peaches, apricots and grapes grow. The orchards are spectacular when they burst into blossom during early May. When harvest season and the Blenheim Cherry Festival arrive in mid-July, delicious fruit becomes plentiful throughout the region. The Blenheim Freedom Library & Military Museum, located at 27 George St., preserves a treasure trove of stories, memorabilia, artifacts and archives from local military personnel with service from WW1 to the present. Summer hours are Tue.- Sat., 10 a.m.- 5
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Blyth
Blyth’s community spirit is evident in the energetic events that thrive with volunteer effort of residents. The Blyth Festival reflects the local ethos of the village with its cutting-edge plays by talented playwrights performed by professional actors. In keeping with its venue in the Memorial Hall that serves as both a community space and cenotaph, Blyth Festival theatre pays homage to the Canadian identity in both playful and reverent fashion. Many of its plays are firmly rooted in rural traditions, which will speak clearly to anyone who has connections with farming culture. The
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Britt/Key River
The village of Britt is located halfway between Parry Sound and Sudbury, just far enough off the highway that most folks bypass Hwy 526 that leads to this sleepy little enclave. However, visitors can still have all the perks that go with a waterfront vacation. Britt has some of the finest full service marinas on Georgian Bay where boaters can dock or rent boats, water sports equipment and fishing supplies. Local accommodations include waterfront inn suites, cottages and campgrounds. Guests can enjoy dining overlooking the river in Britt where fresh fish dinners are superb. The Key River also
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Chatham
Chatham has the distinction of having an historic downtown shopping sector with an abundance of heritage architecture that is easily accessed by road or public dockage and riverside promenade along the Thames River that parallels downtown King Street. Tecumseh Park and Chatham Cultural Centre's museums, galleries and theatre provide fascinating diversions that are all within close walking distance of the downtown. Chatham-Kent is Classic Car Capital of Canada since it has the largest concentration of car festivals, car clubs and industries in the country. RM Classic Cars is located
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Clinton
Clinton has the distinction of displaying artistic murals on various downtown buildings. The paintings depict historic icons of the town and enhance the heritage aspect of Huron County’s finest Victorian architecture. The town was also the place where radar technology was developed and tested for aircraft surveillance during World War 2. Downtown Millenium Park is a lovely spot to stroll and enjoy the flower gardens beside the clock tower and information booth. Charming shops and restaurants add to the local attractions. The original CNR School on Wheels Railroad Museum car was one of
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Collingwood
Collingwood has many attractions, from alpine ski slopes in winter to beautiful scenery and clear blue waters of Georgian Bay in summer. The Niagara Escarpment casts a silhouette in the west that can appear hazy blue, thereby earning its name - Blue Mountain. Collingwood has an extensive recreational trail system that intersects the Georgian Trail to Meaford. The Enviropark playground, picnic area and washrooms adjoin Sunset Point Park on the shoreline at the end of Huron St. The harbour supports boat cruises, rentals, a sailing school and a dragon boat-canoe club. Collingwood’s
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Dresden
Dresden is home to a prominent historic site that is part of the African Canadian Heritage Tour: Uncle Tom's Cabin Historic Site commemorates the work of Josiah Henson who helped runaway American slaves start new lives after following the "Underground Railroad" to freedom. An interpretive centre and pioneer homestead, located at 29251 Uncle Tom's Road, present the story of this international hero.  The OLG Slots at Dresden Raceway is a popular entertainment venue for wagering and slot machine gaming.
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Durham
Durham Conservation Area is located within the town of Durham, spanning 3 km. of the Saugeen River. The campground has 200 treed sites - regular, serviced and seasonal. McGowan Falls cascades beneath the park dam, which holds a reservoir for fishing, swimming and boating. Trails allow visitors to explore the intriguing riverscape and a small grotto beneath the falls. The Saugeen River offers superb canoeing and its clean pools are perfect places to cool off during hot weather.  The town of Durham features a substantial amount of heritage architecture that lends character to this
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Dyer's Bay
Dyer's Bay has a tidy harbour where a commemorative ship's propeller is displayed near the dock. Cabot Head Road runs through the hamlet and becomes increasingly austere until it reaches the lonely promontory. Along the way, a cascade that drains Gillies Lake, the only inland lake in Southern Ontario that contains lake trout, empties through this underground stream. The Cabot Head Lighthouse, built in 1896, is a museum that contains nature displays and historical artifacts. The tower provides a panoramic view of the shoreline. A walkway leads to the Wingfield Basin. Several shipwrecks lie
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Elmvale
Elmvale makes a convenient stop over for visitors on the route between Georgian Bay’s beaches. The village has numerous shops, markets and restaurants to serve travelers. Elmvale Heritage Park has a picnic shelter located on Road 92 just west of the downtown core. Orr Lake Park, situated east of Elmvale on County Road 19, has a nice beach on the inland lake. Elmvale Jungle Zoo, located on Hwy 27, provides an exciting outing among exotic animals in a shady park setting that encompasses 25 acres of natural landscape. Giraffes, big cats, monkeys, colourful birds and giant reptiles can be
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Espanola
Espanola has an interesting history that dates back to the establishment of Spanish colonies in America. Apparently local Ojibwe traded with southern tribes and returned with a Spanish woman who had been abducted. She must have taught others to speak her language because French voyageurs that first entered the region were amazed to hear some natives speaking Spanish. Thus the Spanish River was named after this remarkable woman. Espanola offers visitor services such as the Recreation Complex, golf, motels, restaurants and shopping. Campsites and resorts provide retreats amongst breathtaking
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Evansville
Lake Wolsey connects with the North Channel through a narrow gap where a picnic area and beach are located near Indian Point Lookout. The area is popular for fishing and bird watching. Deer and other animals are very numerous on west Manitoulin so motorists should be wary of colliding with wildlife, especially at dusk.
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Exeter
Exeter is a major commercial centre for South Huron with numerous shops and restaurants to serve visitors. It is a tidy town that shows off some of the most beautiful parks and recreation areas in Huron County. Some of those parks are home to Exeter’s famous white squirrels, which are unusual since they are not albinos, but a white colour phase of the common Gray squirrel. They may be seen romping through MacNaughton Park where the MacNaughton-Morrison Trail follows the creek to Morrison Dam Conservation Area as part of the South Huron Trail. The trails are well groomed for biking,
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Flesherton
The town of Flesherton is located in the Grey Highlands, an area that is riddled with springs and aquifers that spawn four river systems that drain Southern Ontario. The countryside is a charming mix of hilly fields and forested tracts that merge with the edge of the Niagara Escarpment at the southern end of the scenic Beaver Valley. Nearby Eugenia Falls Conservation Area has the highest cataract in Grey County, located in Eugenia on Road 13. The Bruce Trail hugs precipitous limestone walls of the gorge where the park maintains a picnic area and toilet facilities. Parking fee of $4 is
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Forest
Forest has Victorian architecture in its downtown block that presents fine examples of local heritage. The library at the west end of King St. is located in the beautifully refurbished train station. The Forest skate park and rail trail are adjacent to the library on Railroad Way; great recreational venues for skate boarding and cycling. The Kineto Kiwanis Theatre shows movies downtown in its original, old fashion cinema. Fresh produce is available at local markets and pick-your-own farms. The Esli Dodge Conservation Area at the south end of town has a picnic area, pond, trails, tennis courts
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French River/Alban/Noelville
Since the famous explorers Champlain and Brûlé traveled through the New World in 1615, European settlers have mingled with Aboriginal people to form long-term relationships in the French River area. Ojibwe, Métis, French and English settlements were established in the region long before Canada became a nation. This has enabled communities of the French River to develop a mixture of traditions and languages that lend a colourful character to a region steeped in legends and romance. One can receive greetings of “Bozhoo”, “Bonjour” or
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Goderich
Goderich is steeped in history. It proudly calls itself the "Canada's Prettiest Town" with good reason since great care is taken to keep the town attractive. From its beginning as a colonial town, Goderich was a microcosm of the former British Empire. Its octagonal traffic circle at the centre of town actually resembles the pattern of the Union Jack flag. The town is situated high on the bluffs that provide panoramic views of the lake and harbour. The sunsets are spectacular from Lighthouse Park on Cobourg St. just off West St.; there stands the lighthouse built in 1847. One can actually see
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Gore Bay
No matter how you look at it, Gore Bay has great views. The view of the entire town, nestled between the cliffs that surround it and the bay, is best from the East Bluff lookout via Hall St. and Scotland Rd to a picnic area at the top of the escarpment. The Red Roof Pavilion at the docks, has views of the harbour from its balconies and lookout tower. A playground, skateboard ramp, tennis and basketball courts adjoin the longest boardwalk on Manitoulin. Benches and gazebos provide picnic spots along the waterfront. Swim docks and a beach are located on the far side of the harbour. Harbour
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Grand Bend
When most people think of Grand Bend's place name, the magnificent curve of Lake Huron's shoreline comes to mind. However, the sharp bend in the Ausable River actually gave Grand Bend its name. The old channel can still be seen paralleling the shoreline off River Road. Grand Bend has a lovely downtown streetscape and a newly landscaped waterfront park with a picnic area, children’s playground and splash pad. The beach house has washrooms, showers, lookout deck and picnic area for bathers. In Grand Bend one is never far from the sun, sand and surf that everyone loves. The main beach is
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Harrow/Colchester
Colchester, located on scenic County Road 50, has a lovely beach, playground, boat launch and harbour with direct access to the best walleye fishing in Lake Erie. Visitors can “explore the shore” by following County Road 50 through lush beauty of the Carolinian zone that produces much of Ontario’s soft fruits. Farms, orchards and wineries offer tours and samplings of their delicious products. The Essex Pelee Island Coast (EPIC) Wine Route joins vintners between the towns of Maidstone, Amherstburg, Colchester, Harrow, Kingsville, Pelee Island and Leamington. The burgeoning
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Hepworth
Hepworth is located east of the popular Sauble Beach resort area and the small village also offers attractions for visitors. Several golf courses in the area feature a variety of terrain and challenging layouts. Sauble Speedway holds stock car races and entertainment at its quarter-mile oval track on summer weekends. The Sauble River is a scenic canoe route that offers remote and wild sections for experienced paddlers; hazardous falls must be bypassed near Allenford, Park Head, just upstream of Hepworth Road bridge (Bruce Rd 8) and at the Jewel Bridge Road. Skinner Marsh-McNabb Lake
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Honey Harbour
Honey Harbour is located on the edge of Muskoka District as a pretty little village that beckons visitors to the heart of “cottage country”. Its cottage rentals, camping parks, marinas, golf courses and resorts provide a variety of services for recreation. This is also the gateway to Georgian Bay’s fabulous 30,000 Islands, a UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve that is unequalled in its beauty and biodiversity. It is the world’s largest fresh-water archipelago. The region contains the iconic, windswept White pines, oak savannahs and glacier-polished granite islands where
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Ipperwash Beach
Ipperwash Beach has a shallow, sandy shore perfect for swimming where series of sandbars extend into the lake over 100 metres. This is a beachcomber’s paradise that seems to stretch on endlessly. One can walk for kilometers along the white, sugary sand or relax under the aromatic pines and cedars in picnic areas between the dunes. This is one of the finest, most popular beaches in Ontario with some free parking and public toilet facilities. Boat launching and water sport rentals are available as well as shops and restaurants where beachgoers can browse between swims. The shoreline is a
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Kagawong
Kagawong is located on Manitoulin’s north shore in a world of its own, sheltered by Mudge Bay. The quaint village welcomes visitors with a fine beach, harbour, picnic shelter, café, shops and art studios. The Old Mill Heritage Centre & Post Office Museum displays changing theme exhibits as well as an historical account of the famous Dodge family tragedy.  It opens daily 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. in summer; Tue.- Sat. spring and fall. An outdoor Farmers’ Market serves island products on Wednesdays 11 a.m.– 4 p.m., July to August. Bridal Veil Falls cascades into a
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Killarney
Killarney Provincial Park, the jewel of Ontario's wilderness parks, is accessible via Hwy 637, Hwy 6 at Charlton Lake near Willisville or Lake Panache via Road 10. The stunning La Cloche Mountains contain lakes that are famous for their azure colour and clarity. Some are so lucid that their bottoms can be seen many fathoms below. Hiking trails provide access to interior lakes and ethereal, quartz ridges with panoramic vistas from the Silhouette Trail and Silver Peak, the highest point in the park. Backcountry campsites are limited and must be reserved in advance. Paddlers entering the park
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Kincardine
Kincardine has much for visitors to discover. Remembering its Scottish heritage, Kincardine’s famous century-old Pipe Band marches downtown on summer Saturday evenings at 8 p.m. Huge throngs of people march with the band, which returns to Victoria Park for a concert following the parade. Golf is also big with four courses in the area. Some of the most challenging fairways can be found at Ainsdale Golf Course, which maintains an automated irrigation system. Its sister course, Somerhill Golf has a tidy 9 holes tucked into rolling landscape south of Tiverton. Lake Huron’s beautiful
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Kingsville
Kingsville has strong roots in the British Empire loyalist tradition as is evident by its elegant architecture. Lakeside Park has picnic areas in a lovely, treed valley that follows the stream to Lake Erie. Cedar Creek Conservation Area, south of County Rd 20 on County Rd 23, features scenic trails and a canoe route. Cedar Beach has picnic facilities and swimming on County Rd 50. Kingsville is best known as the home of Jack Miner, who initiated the conservation movement by establishing the Jack Miner Bird Sanctuary in 1904. Its feeding pond and museum open daily except Sundays. The sanctuary
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Leamington
Yes, that is a giant tomato housing the information booth in uptown Leamington! Leamington is Canada’s “Tomato Capital” and has the largest concentration of greenhouses in North America. Roadside stands sell abundant, fresh produce during summer and fall, while the vibrant business sector offers a variety of specialty shops, dining and accommodations. A diverse range of services along with the mildest climate in Ontario and recreation facilities such as the refurbished Municipal Marina and the Kinsmen Recreation Complex, have rated Leamington one of the best towns to live
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Lion's Head/Ferndale
Nestled on the shore of Isthmus Bay on the east side of the Bruce Peninsula, Lion’s Head is one of the neatest villages you can find. The natural harbour with its limestone cliffs overlooking the clear blue waters of Georgian Bay, offers breathtaking scenery. The village got its name from a cliff on the east escarpment that resembled the profile of a lion. The famous Bruce Trail follows Moore St. to the east bluff and leads up to the top of the escarpment through the Lion’s Head Provincial Nature Reserve, providing panoramic views of the bay. This area contains the largest
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Little Current
The town of Little Current derived its name from a native word meaning, where the water begins to flow. The current does flow in different directions, depending on surges created by wind. This is the location of the CPR swing bridge that connects the island to the mainland. Every hour on the hour it swings open, stopping highway traffic to let boats sail through. The Manitoulin Information Centre has dockage and a picnic area with a fine view of the bridge. Turner Park, located at Walcot St. & Campbell St., has a panoramic lookout above the harbour. The Strawberry Island Lighthouse stands
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M'Chigeeng
The Ojibwe Cultural Foundation is an impressive structure designed to represent the turtle, a sacred animal in aboriginal mythology. The building contains a museum with rare artifacts, an art gallery and a traditional sweat lodge healing centre. The museum displays some of the best porcupine quillwork in Canada, with stunning examples of stitched pieces and three-dimensional tufting. The gallery also exhibits monthly local artisan shows. Native traditions are shown by video displays in the atrium. A covered amphitheatre holds cultural events as well as weekday craft demonstrations, drumming
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MacTier
MacTier is in the heart of Muskoka's cottage country and provides visitors with supply services. The village is a good staging point for visits to fabulous Lake Joseph and Massasauga Provincial Park, which are unparalleled waterways for their beauty and heritage. The Railroad Heritage Society Caboose exhibits railroad artifacts, nostalgia and historical displays of the village's ties to the railways that run through the region. 
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Magnetawan
Magnetawan is a scenic little village that has been in existence since the mid-1800’s. Steam ships began to ply the waters of the Magnetawan River beginning in Burk’s Falls and travelling to Magnetawan and on to Ahmic Harbour crossing 2 lakes, Lake Cecebe and Ahmic Lake. Boat lift locks were necessary at Magnetawan and hand operated lift locks are still in place. Visitors may walk across two rushing waterfalls at the locks and continue a half-hour hike around the Island. From the locks you have a view of St. George the Martyr Anglican Church, made famous by Casson of the Group of
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Manitowaning
Manitowaning has recreation facilities to help visitors enjoy fishing, water sports, hiking or relaxation. B-Zone skate park features ramps, rails and table tops for boards, blades and bikes beside the tennis courts. Rainbow Ridge Golf Course has a contoured, 18-hole course, driving range, putting green and a clubhouse with a great view. Assiginack Museum has an interesting collection of items from early life on the island. Exhibits include a furnished pioneer home, school, blacksmith shop and log barn full of farm antiques. It opens daily June 1 – Sep. 30. Other local historical
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Meaford
The pretty town of Meaford hugs the south shore of Georgian Bay where the blue waters stretch to the horizon, affording grand sunsets as well as fishing and boating. The harbour, with its tidy walkways, is a snug haven for pleasure craft, while the downtown shows off fine Victorian architecture. Memorial Park offers free swimming and day use along its lovely beach. Dog lovers will love Beautiful Joe Park, located at 162 Edwin Street West; a pet-friendly picnic area and pavilion with monuments to special pets and a local dog that inspired the famous novel, Beautiful Joe. Meaford Hall presents
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Meldrum Bay
Meldrum Bay, at the west end of Hwy 540, is literally at land’s end with the enchanting atmosphere of being at the end of a rainbow. The village has services of a store, camping, cottages and inn lodging. Boat docks and a break wall provide improved shelter for boats while the new harbour centre has a lounge, refreshments, showers and laundry facilities. The bay contains shipwrecks that beg to be explored while salmon lurk in the bay just waiting for an angler’s lure. The Net Shed Museum exhibits artifacts daily during summer. At the remote western tip of the island stands the
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Midland
Midland is Ontario’s premier mural community! The downtown and waterfront display over 40 historical murals, including North America’s largest outdoor mural. The murals can be toured to discover iconic aspects of the town’s heritage. Downtown Midland has an immaculately landscaped waterfront with harbour services, picnic areas, paved bike trails and specialty shops to interest visitors, with free 3-hour parking at community lots. Little Lake Park has a picnic area under huge oak trees, with tennis, volleyball and shuffleboard courts, mini golf, a recreation trail, skate park
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Miller Lake
Miller Lake has sheltered beaches, swimming and boating along its shoreline. Its water warms up quickly in summer and it has some of the safest swimming available for children. Boaters may use the public boat launch at 164 Miller Lake Shore Road or the picnic area at the end of Maple Drive. Boat rentals, camping and cottage accommodations are also available along the lake. Local artisans demonstrate their crafts at studios where visitors can discover unusual treasures. Rare plant habitats with exquisite wildflowers such as Lakeside daisies and Dwarf Lake irises can be found at Bruce Alvar
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Mindemoya
An aboriginal legend tells of a grandmother who fell into the lake and became its island. The lake and village thus were named after the “old woman”. Mindemoya is centrally located on Manitoulin with accommodations, restaurants, shopping, golfing and a hospital. Resorts and campgrounds around Mindemoya Lake make it a prime area for a holiday. Manitoulin’s lakes warm up quickly, providing the earliest swimming of the season. In autumn numerous maple trees create a splendid show of colour throughout the district. The Old School Yard Park, next to the community centre on Hwy
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Mitchell's Bay
Boat dockage, launches, beaches, picnic areas with shelter pavilions and playgrounds are available at Mitchell's Bay. The extensive marshlands along Lake St. Clair draw anglers and hunters for the chance to bag trophy fish or waterfowl. The area is also prized for its excellent kite boarding and wind surfing conditions, and it has a growing following of surf culture enthusiasts who participate in events and competitions for the water sports every summer.
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Mooretown
St. Clair Township’s camping and recreational facilities are second to none. Campers can also enjoy spacious sites and an outdoor pool at Mooretown Campground or use indoor recreation facilities at the Mooretown Sports Complex, which has a Junior Olympic swimming pool, fitness centre and twin ice pads. The adjoining St. Clair Parkway Golf Course has a beautiful layout among rolling ravines and hawthorn trees. In Mooretown, the Moore Museum is a veritable mirror of the past. The pioneering lore and marine heritage of the area are displayed in nine buildings; a church, old-fashioned
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Oil Springs
Many historic sites can be explored with an Oil Historical Audio Driving Tour from the Oil Museum of Canada. Ingenious jerker lines that power several pumps from a single motor, rigs and a rail tanker car are set up in the area where many wells are still producing oil. Whimsical metal sculptures enhance the oil fields where ghostly cranks creak as they turn ancient oil pumps. At Oil Springs, the museum presents a movie and many new exhibits that show how oil was formed under the earth's crust. A diorama dramatizes the adventures of early oilmen who prospected for, drilled and extracted oil
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Owen Sound
A panoramic lookout of Owen Sound is possible from Centennial Tower on 9th Ave. East (Hwy 6) at the top of the hill. Kelso Beach Park has a beach, boat launch and picnic area next to the marina on 3rd Avenue West. The Harbour Walkway skirts the waterfront all around the harbour. Georgian Bluffs Trail is a 16-km., hard-packed trail for cycling and hiking that connects the west outskirts of Owen Sound to Shallow Lake and Park Head on Road 10. The scenic route along Road 1 through Balmy Beach offers panoramic views of the bay and nearby Indian Falls, a bight shaped, 15-metre cataract. Jones
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Paisley
Paisley has an interesting collection of shops and cafes along its downtown core lined with heritage architecture from a previous century. It boasts a Farmers’ Market and the Rotary Riverside Park, which offers camping and picnic facilities along the Saugeen River. Paisley is located at the confluence of the Saugeen and Teeswater Rivers where paddlers can rent canoes for a leisurely, two-day trip downstream to Southampton on the region's most popular paddling route. Numerous launch locations provide easy access and parking at bridges along the river. The Saugeen Valley
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Parry Sound
The 30,000 Islands World Biosphere Reserve awaits you in a setting of unparalleled natural beauty. Take a boat tour through the world’s largest freshwater archipelago aboard the Island Queen cruise ship. The vessel is 40 metres long and carries 550 passengers. Tours depart once daily during spring and fall, and twice daily in summer. The ship threads through narrow gaps between sheer cliffs like Hole in the Wall, ice-carved outer islands and picturesque passages such as Devil’s Elbow and the Rose Point Swing Bridge. Join Captain Greg and his crew aboard the M.V. Chippewa III, a
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Pelee Island
Many people travel far south to find relaxed, island atmosphere, yet it exists directly in Ontario on Pelee Island! Pelee is known for its vineyards, quiet, secluded beaches, Ecological Trail System and the best bird watching opportunities in Canada. Many birds stop on the island to rest on their northbound migrations and people do too. Visitors may be surprised to get friendly waves from passers-by. This is just part of the congenial atmosphere of the island where the pace of life is unhurried. The beauty of island living offers a chance to retreat from the rest of the world. Pelee Island
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Penetanguishene
Penetanguishene’s harbour, beach, playground and skate-park adjoin the Waterfront Trail that leads to Midland from Champlain Rd. The Tiny Trail parallels County Rd 6 as a scenic bike path. The town combines a colourful blend of French-Anglo culture with a full range of attractions and amenities for visitors. Take a morning or afternoon sightseeing cruise and experience the sparkling water, windswept pines and rocky grandeur of Muskoka/Georgian Bay’s 30,000 islands. The Serendipity Princess departs the Historic Port of Penetanguishene (town dock) daily May to September.
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Petrolia
Petrolia in the nineteenth century was the birthplace of the world’s oil refining industry and the richest town in Canada.  Remnants of the oil boom glory days are still visible in town.  The downtown is attractively styled in keeping with its heritage of manicured parks, flowerbeds, well-tended properties and charming Victorian architecture.   Buildings unique to the affluent oil boom include Petrolia’s Victoria Hall and library.  Mansions complete with elegant woodwork, ostentatious towers and stained glass windows can be seen as outlined in a heritage
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Pointe au Baril
Pointe au Baril has marine access to some of the most beautiful areas in the Georgian Bay archipelago where visitors can enjoy idyllic swimming, picnic spots, camping and cottage resorts. The 30,000 Islands are truly spectacular as the world’s most extensive lake based island chain. Its glacier-scoured, granite islands dotted by windswept pines, contain some of Canada’s most incredible scenery, delicate ecosystems with rare plants and animals as well as culturally significant marine architecture, historic sites and shipwrecks. Most of the islands may be visited since they are
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Port Carling
Port Carling has many golf courses, resorts, charming boutiques and restaurants located in the heart of “cottage country”. The village overlooks the boat locks between Lake Rosseau and Lake Muskoka where heritage steam ships Segwun and Wenonah II cruise through the channels. Bridge lifts are a regular occurrence when the ships move through the locks, providing a good photo opportunity for those who like to watch big machinery in action. Peerless II gives sightseeing, sunset and dinner cruises from Port Carling locks and the classic wooden yacht Idyllwood provides intimate tours
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Port Elgin
Port Elgin, truly a family destination, is one of the busiest resort communities on the Lake Huron shoreline. The spectacular sunsets that this area is famous for can best be seen from the harbour - a must for photographers and romantics. Restaurants and pubs offer everything from popular roadhouse fare to gourmet meals for the discriminating diner. Free parking is conveniently located directly on the beach. The harbour and sandy beach are partly sheltered by breakwalls and the beachfront is very popular for swimming and windsurfing. Beach volleyball courts are set up during the summer and
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Port Franks
The hidden village of Port Franks seems to be worlds away from the bustle of everyday life and yet it is so accessible to visitors. Port Franks has abundant accommodations, shops, marina facilities, restaurants and some of the most beautiful, wooded campgrounds in Lambton County. These resorts are perfect for families since they maintain quiet surroundings, recreation facilities and organized activities for children. Tennis courts, a skateboard park and washrooms are located at the community centre at 9996 Port Franks Rd. The Ausable River Cut flows into Lake Huron at Port Franks, creating a
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Port Severn
Port Severn has accommodations and marine services situated along the scenic Trent-Severn Waterway, which connects Georgian Bay to Lake Ontario. This area is most diverse since it is the transition zone between the St. Lawrence Lowlands and the southern edge of the Canadian Shield. Off road trails provide invigorating walking, cycling or skiing through naturalized corridors free of traffic, such as the Rotary Waterfront Trail and the Tay Shore Trail between Midland and Waubaushene. Port Severn Park has a picnic gazebo and playground located on Minten’s Lane. The School House Trail
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Providence Bay
At Providence Bay, the longest beach on Manitoulin waits to caress your feet with soft sand and clean water. Take a stroll on the boardwalk that runs along the lovely beach. It is wheelchair accessible and stretches from the pavilion across the Mindemoya River bridge to the campground at the east end. The east shore has rugged limestone ledges and clefts that are fun to explore. The sand dunes are fragile formations that are held down only by the grasses and shrubs that grow on them. Visitors should protect the dunes from erosion by not trampling the vegetation. The River Trail hiking path
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Red Bay/Mar
Public boat launches are located at Red Bay and Oliphant. Red Bay beach has a lovely playground and shaded picnic area with toilets. It is perfect for families with small children since it has minimal traffic and is sheltered. Its shallow, sandy shoreline warms up quickly. The meandering coast presents limestone flats and outcrops interspersed with pockets of sand - an intriguing area for beachcombing. Red Bay Conservation Area is a dune landscape on Reid’s Point, southwest of the Red Bay Park and beach. A shady picnic area is located at Mar on Hwy 6. This is also the turn-off for the
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Ridgetown
Ridgetown is known as “the friendliest town in Ontario” and is home to many visitor services and the Ridgetown Agricultural College, whose gardens and facilities may be toured. The nearby shores of Lake Erie offer a number of attractions: Built in 1875, the Ridge House Museum is housed in a typical Ontario style home with period furnishings to portray the values and lifestyles of a middle class family. The Ridge House structure and grounds have been restored and are maintained to their Victorian roots. Ridge House Museum also presents exhibitions at the Mary Webb Centre community
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Rosseau
The village of Rosseau is situated on the boundary between Muskoka and Parry Sound Districts. It has lovely lakes for water sports and lakefront accommodations in the region, as well as prestigious academic institutions such as Rosseau Lake College where students benefit from an eclectic, outdoor oriented curriculum of the highest calibre. The village also sports a Farmers’ Market, boutiques and restaurants. The Humphrey Schoolhouse Museum, located on Hwy 141, exhibits the area’s pioneering history. Nearby Rosseau Falls is a scenic cascade beside a picnic area on Hwy 141 east of
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Sarnia
Sarnia, with its twin Bluewater Bridges spanning the St. Clair River, is an international gateway to Ontario. Sarnia’s hospitality industry is well developed with numerous excellent dining and entertainment choices for visitors. The city has many parks that beautify the waterfront: Canatara Park, at the end of Christina St. North, has nature trails and one kilometre of Lake Huron beach supervised by lifeguards. Giant oaks create a shady picnic area around Lake Chipican. A Children’s Farm has a petting zoo, duck pond and miniature buildings. The adjacent BMX Bike Track features
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Sauble Beach
Picture this - a warm summer day, basking in the sun alongside a sparkling lake.  A gentle breeze wafts the grasses in the sugary dunes behind you.  The sand underfoot is soft and some children are building a sand castle and splashing in the clean water.  It’s Sauble Beach.  The 11-km beach has been voted by popular polls as one of Ontario’s best beaches based on water quality, visitor services and family atmosphere.  It is also recognized internationally as a Blue Flag beach. People flock to see the spectacular reflections off the water as the sun slowly
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Sheguiandah
Manitoulin’s geology is part of the Niagara Escarpment with the high cliffs appearing on the east and North Channel, while the flattest areas dip into Lake Huron to the south. Sheguiandah is located at the exposed, scenic side. Bass Lake Creek creates a pretty cascade past a replica of the water-powered Batman Sawmill. A viewing platform is located beside a fish ladder where jumping fish can be observed during spring or fall spawning runs. A picturesque boardwalk links this park with the village along Dunlop St. Docks, launch ramps, toilets and a picnic area provide parking and access
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Sheshegwaning/Silver Water
Sheshegwaning First Nation is located 50 km. west of Gore Bay.The village’s Annual Traditional Pow Wow features local cuisine, dance and culture the 3rd weekend in June. Nimkee’s Trail begins at Beach Road and Cape Robert Road. The trail has 20 km. of loops along scenic shorelines to Eagle’s Lookout on the high bluffs at Cape Robert, where the North Shore is visible. The nearby village of Zhibaahaasing displays the world’s largest peace pipe, dream catcher and pow wow drum. Silver Water has a lovely beach at Silver Lake. Elizabeth Bay beach is located on Pine Haven
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Sombra
St. Clair Township’s camping and recreational facilities are second to none. Located north of Sombra, Branton Cundick Park and Cathcart Park campgrounds offer river front access and quiet relaxation with serviced sites, showers and playgrounds. Located south of Sombra, MacDonald Park and Marshy Creek Park have scenic picnic areas or a pavilion while Brander Park also features a splash pad and playground. Sombra Village is the location of the first ferry crossing south of Sarnia from Marine City, Michigan. The service operates daily to shuttle pedestrians and vehicles across the
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South Baymouth
Manitoulin means “home of the Great Spirit” and for many people it is a place with a character all its own. Although located in Northern Ontario, it is an extension of the Niagara Escarpment. Culturally it exhibits the charm of a land apart with the distinction of being the world’s largest fresh-water island. South Baymouth has complete tourist services, boat docks, launch ramps and fuel. John Budd Memorial Park provides picnic facilities on Hwy 6. The harbour has tidy boardwalks that provide a view of the marina and the historic range beacons. A children’s playground
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Southampton
One visit to historic Southampton, oldest port on the Bruce Coast, and visitors will know why it makes a great destination. The community has a variety of quaint accommodations (including bed and breakfasts, motels, inns, cottage courts, private cottages and campgrounds), restaurants, cafes, art galleries and specialty boutiques. The beaches are free of automobile traffic, hence the peaceful surroundings that make Southampton one of the most idyllic communities on Lake Huron. Take a stroll along the beach Boardwalk from the Big Flag to the Long Dock area. Children’s playgrounds are
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Spring Bay
Some of Manitoulin’s nicest niches are located centrally between Mindemoya and Spring Bay. West of Mindemoya, a pretty picnic area is located near the outflow of the Mindemoya River. Further west, the impressive Manitoulin Cenotaph Park honours local military servicemen and women and merchant marine seamen who lost their lives in the World Wars. The park also provides washrooms and a shady picnic area. Follow Monument Road north to a lovely beach on the west shore of Mindemoya Lake before encountering Mindemoya Cave. When the cave was first discovered, human skeletons were found inside
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Stokes Bay
The peninsula’s western shore slopes gently into Lake Huron with less dramatic relief than the east has, but the sunset views are more enchanting. Its fens and alvars also shelter the most exquisite and rare wildflowers such as the Wood lily, Dwarf Lake Iris, Lakeside daisy, Indian Paintbrush and Pitcher-plants. Huron Road between Red Bay and Pike Bay hugs the shoreline for much of the way. A picnic area adjoins the shallow beach at the east end of Pike Bay. Follow Whiskey Harbour Road west to Eastnor Township Park at Site #283. This secluded picnic spot overlooks unusual pockmarked and
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Sudbury
The City of Greater Sudbury is the largest urban centre in Northern Ontario. It claims 330 lakes within its boundaries and has one of the highest percentages of parkland in Canada. Jane Goodall Reclamation Trail forms a loop at the Coniston information kiosk on Hwy 17. Lake Laurentian Conservation Area features 2,600 acres of green space with self-guided nature trails and picnic sites, located on South Bay Rd off Ramsey Lake Rd. Lily Creek Park, on Paris St., has a marsh boardwalk across the road from the Jim Gordon Boardwalk that links Science North with Bell Park beach. The Ramsey Lake
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Tehkummah
Blue Jay Creek Fish Culture Station raises lake trout and is located near the junction of Hwy 542 and 542-A. The station has a picnic area and observation gallery of the hatchery. It opens to visitors daily 9 a.m.- 4 p.m. with displays, videos and self-guided tours. Several upwelling springs can be seen from the trail that follows the stream. Nearby Sandfield has a nice picnic area beside the boat launch on Manitou Lake where the Manitou River outlet begins. The lake is well known for its excellent fishing. Kicking Mule Riding Ranch is located north of Tehkummah on Hwy 6 at Gauthier’s
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The Blue Mountains
Blue Mountain Resort continues to develop as Ontario's largest alpine skiing and snowboarding complex. The Village at Blue Mountain has an astounding choice of dining options, entertainment, film nights and festivals. The resort also offers a spate of summer activities: Tennis courts and golf on signature courses are ever popular. Mountain biking trails, terrain parks, ramps and jumps provide adrenaline highs for downhill or free-ride cyclists. Both climbers and novices who wish to learn can attempt the Climbing Wall or Timber Challenge High Ropes Course with 75 elements up to 15 metres high.
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Thornbury/Clarksburg
Thornbury has a tidy downtown with traditional architecture, boutiques and restaurants for discriminating gourmands. It is the heart of apple country where many merchants are part of the culinary award-winning Apple Pie Trail that gives visitors a taste of many apple related products in the region. Pastries, cider, apple recipes and markets all have delicious offerings of the “forbidden fruit”. The Beaver River is designated a Heritage River due to its beautiful scenery and important wetland habitat. A 25-km., 5-hour canoe trip is possible from Kimberley to the Slabtown dam north
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Tiverton/Inverhuron
A major tourist attraction near Inverhuron is the Bruce Power Visitors’ Centre. Located west of Hwy 21 on Bruce County Rd 20, the Visitors’ Centre commands a panoramic view of the world’s largest nuclear site with eight Candu reactors. The exhibit hall features attractive murals and a self-guided tour of 30 displays, models, computer games and videos that explain how electricity is made using nuclear technology. Knowledgeable staff is on hand to answer any questions. The centre’s grounds are perfect for enjoying a picnic lunch and to marvel at wind turbines that
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Tobermory
Tobermory is the “SCUBA Diving Capital of Ontario” and favourite resort of many people since it has a delightful assortment of services for such a small village. It still retains the quaint charm of a fishing village, as can be witnessed by taking a stroll around Little Tub harbour. Beautifully bricked walkways, flowerbeds and boardwalks surround the docks. Boats are big business in “the Tub”, where visitors can take cruise boats, dive or snorkel charters to 22 shipwreck sites, or launch their own boats from the harbours. Many people like to rent a kayak or canoe to
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Wallaceburg
The Wallaceburg & District Museum, located at 505 King St., reflects the colourful history of Wallaceburg. The Glass House Gallery shows off an impressive collection of hand-blown pieces and whimsies from the Wallaceburg glass factory.  Displays include an Industrial Exhibit, Baldoon Mystery, Sports Hall of Fame, Marine Room, Streetscape, Legion Room featuring original 1878 prototype Lee Enfield rifles, and changing gallery exhibitions. A favourite exhibit is the world’s largest brass faucet, one of only two made by the Waltec company. Hours are 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., Mon. -
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Wasaga Beach
Wasaga Beach is a favourite resort town that boasts the world’s longest fresh-water beach as well as numerous visitor services. Wasaga Beach Provincial Park is unique since it is located within the boundaries of the town as a day-use park. Its parabolic dune system is the largest in Ontario. Rare plants and animals such as the Piping Plover and Eastern Hognose Snake find refuge in the park. The Wasaga Nordic Trails offers scenic hiking through the dunes, and in winter, 30 km. of groomed cross-country ski trails including a chalet with rentals and refreshments. The beach areas are
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Wheatley
Wheatley is Ontario’s fishery capital where most of Lake Erie’s commercial fish harvest is processed. Wheatley Provincial Park is located just east of Wheatley off Rd 3. It has beaches, campsites and trails through lush forest that contains sycamores, sassafras, hickory and tulip trees. Hillman Marsh Conservation Area is one of the premier areas for viewing birds in Essex County. The 850-acre marsh contains trails and a beach, at 1826 County Rd 37 & Mersea Rd 2 at the extreme east shore of the county. A fascinating nature display centre, lookout tower and picnic area are
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Whitefish Falls
Three geological zones merge near Whitefish Falls, so rock collectors can find interesting samples there. A lovely picnic area and museum are located at Stanley White Park next to the pool below scenic Whitefish Falls. With direct access onto the Bay of Islands and the North Channel, boating, swimming and fishing are superb. Bass, pickerel, pike and muskellunge abound in these waters and resort operators can give their guests true wilderness experiences in unspoiled surroundings. For a gorgeous view of the landscape, take the Willisville Road off Hwy 6. Bright, quartz mountains gleam against
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Wiarton
Wiarton is the perfect place to explore the Bruce Peninsula from since it straddles two counties and provides plenty of services for visitors. Take a stroll along the Bluewater Park with its outdoor pool, sheltered picnic area, boat launch, splash pad, pirate ship playground and beach. The centerpiece of the park is the South Bruce Peninsula Heritage Centre inside the original railway station. It contains elaborate woodwork, a beautiful oval oak bench and historical exhibits. Information is located at the station. Beside the shore, a three-metre high, white dolomite statue entitled Willie
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Wikwemikong
Located on the eastern peninsula, Wikwemikong is Manitoulin’s largest and only unceded (to the Crown) First Nation community. The residents of “Wiky” as they call it, are proud of their traditions. The community health centre is shaped like an eagle and it employs both medical practices and traditional aboriginal healing methods such as the sweat lodge and herbs. Talented local artists exhibit their work in galleries and studios. Zaawmiknaang Crafts & Eatery is a great place to “go native”. It prepares traditional Anishinabe foods in summer to complement
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Wingham
Wingham could be called Canada’s “Country Music Capital” since it has such a strong tradition of fostering rural musical talent. The town also has a charming streetscape, heritage architecture and riverside recreational trails. The Maitland River provides scenic canoeing and fishing throughout its length and at Riverflats Ecological Park. The North Huron Museum holds archives for the Township of North Huron as well as exhibits and art shows that highlight local heritage, especially its prominence as a radio and television broadcasting centre. The museum opens May to August.
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